Sanctuary for the Abused

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Why Abuse Survivors Attract the Wrong Sort of People





Why Abuse Survivors Attract The Wrong Sort of People

Predators Hunt the Wounded

An abuse survivor e-mailed me saying how she seemed to attract men who want to exploit her. On the other hand, good people seem to run from her. Tragically, this is the common experience of abuse survivors. I have always puzzled as to why this is. She sent me a couple of photos of herself. Then something clicked. I was a little gentler, but here is the essence of my e-mail to her:

Your photos, though nice, give the impression that you are sad, shy, lacking in confidence and aching for love. An evil man might look at those photos and think to himself, “Her need for love and for a boost in self-esteem seem so overwhelming that if I let her think that I could meet these needs, she would be so scared of losing me that she would find it hard to resist the urge to do anything I want. If I initially treat her tenderly and kindly and flatter her, I’ll have a good chance of turning her into virtually my slave. I could then treat her however I wish.”
 

If, on the other hand, a man saw you as happy, confident and relatively content, he’d assume you are quite choosy as to who you relate to and how far you would go. He’d assume you have none of the desperation that pressures some women to compromise their morals to get the love they crave.

Not only could this be a factor in men with evil intent being attracted to you, it could cause good men (or good women) to feel tempted to try to get their way with you. Because they are honorable, they might run for fear that if they stayed close to you they might yield to that temptation.

Regardless of how resistant to sexual pressure she really is, a person with low self-esteem and who craves love gives the impression that she is vulnerable to seduction. Upon finding such a person, immoral men feel emboldened to test their suspicion that they have found someone they could seduce.

To resist sexual advances, a woman craving love and lacking in self-esteem needs far superior self-control to that of other women, if she perceives that she must yield to those advances in order to receive the love she desperately needs. Furthermore, an abuse survivor is strongly tempted to accept the lie that because she has been mistreated before, she has little purity left to protect. This lie is yet another burden weighing down abuse survivors.

Moreover, in addition to these strong pressures, she will find resisting an evil man much harder than other women find it because she has a history of having done everything possible to resist and she was still overpowered. Her past tragedies cause her to lose hope that she could ever successfully prevent a man from exploiting her. She feels sure that any attempt to resist would be a futile waste of effort. Sexual predators know this, so they are on the look out for abuse survivors.


A tragically large number of abuse survivors have mistakenly thought that perhaps they have low morals or are evil or that God is against them, since that they seem to attract sexual predators. This is most certainly not so. The thought is so obviously incorrect that, theoretically, there should be no need to deny it. Sadly, it needs to be spelt out because sexual offenders are skilled at cruelly manipulating tender consciences, causing their victims to have a mistaken view of themselves. The truth is that abuse survivors tend to attract repeat offenses simply because they are hurting; and sexual predators, like beasts of prey, think the wounded might be an easier target.

If predators imagine they have a chance with you, it means nothing. Simply by refusing their advances, you can prove them wrong.

Knowing why the wrong sort of people might try to exploit you can be a relief. There is nothing wrong with you other than the simple fact that you are hurting. I am sure what you really want to know, however, is how to prevent this attention. It’s easy to say that self-esteem, confidence and feeling loved is the answer, but the difficulty is knowing how to grow in these things.

Grantley Morris: healing@net-burst.net

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shared by Barbara at 12:20 AM


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12 Comments:

I am troubled by the suggestion that people who have been abused "attract" abusers in any way. Abusers typically try to make the victim think it is their fault, and the experience of being victimized usually leads to shame which can be difficult to overcome. To suggest that a former victim "attracts" more abusers adds another layer of shame to someone already struggling and lowers, rather than increases, self-confidence.

The author seems to assume that the woman's assessment that she attracts abusers while good guys run is accurate. I'm not sure that is true. She may be having identical experiences that a woman who has not been abused has, but is explaining the phenomenom differently due to her victimization and these types of common attitudes.

There are a lot of men out there who are looking to exploit women. I think they typically cast a wide net and make overtures to large numbers of women. A woman who has not been abused would just write it off as "There's another jerk trolling for victims" and not take it personally.

A man who wants to exploit, only needs a vulnerable target. A man who wants a relationship will be more selective because he has more compatibility criteria. It may not be that the good guys "run", it may simply be that it wasn't a match for them.

Victims don't "attract" abusers. Abusers target potential victims. And they consider most of the female population their potential market.

4:15 PM  

I used to always attract guys who wanted to move in with me and have me support them because I am kind hearted, can pay all my bills, and live alone. They would keep jobs only long enough to date and win me over and then something would happen to that job once they moved in. Usually I only kept them for two months before kicking them out with restraining orders.

3:55 AM  

Wow, "Anonymous" I thought I was the only one like that. I was beaten up, abused and stalked by a jerk who begged me for 10 yrs for "another chance" and I gave in. Guess what? He didn't beat me up the 2nd time, just trashed my house and stole valuable items. I feel like "damaged goods" and I don't have the self-confidence to try to meet anyone else. (But at least I got rid of the psycho for good). Maybe some of us are just meant to be alone?

11:32 AM  

Sad to say but yes it is soo true, I am living proof of this, WE DO ATTRACT LOOSERS, That seems to be all that I was able to attract... I asked a thereapist a question...... DOES IT SAY USERS ABUSERS DRUG ADDICTS AND ALCOHOLICS COME MY WAY ON MY FOREHEAD OR WHAT?????????? She said no that, that is what I am attracted to because of the abuse I have had endured all my life that is what I am attracted to although that is NOT WHAT I WANT THAT IS WHAT I AM ATTRACTED TOO.....

12:27 PM  

Patricia Gallegos -

You do NOT attract these losers; they TARGET the vulnerable.

1:13 AM  

I was abused mentally and physicaly growing up. My real father was never in the picture, and I think I have a classic case of "daddy issues". I am responsible, kind, and sincere. Unfortunately I must appear to have low self esteem, although most of the time I am happy with myself. Men that are interested in me always prove to be predators, preying on the weakness I have under this mask that I wear...I wish I knew how to cure myself of this terrible disposition.

7:44 PM  

I think it is the repetition compulsion. We repeat. We are drawn to what we know. That which is familiar to us, is comfortable to us. We are attracted to people who synch up with our own pathology. Abused people are more apt to repeat those same cycles of an abusive relationship, over and over. I think self-awareness can help, along with knowing your boundaries and rigidly enforcing them.

8:51 PM  

Thanks for your comments. It's a relief to know I'm not alone. :) I've done a lot of reading and research into this and ladies and guys (like myself) I hear what you say about it being a shame thing saying we are Sh*(*&t magnets. There is however a horrible biological truth to that. Any kind of abuse emotional, physical etc especially in early childhood affects how the emotional part of the brain develops. In other words our early attachments create quite a permanent emotional template that we then have to be very conscious of to avoid problem people. The truth is when we feel the emotion of attraction and desire for a person - for us it is often a BIG RED FLAG to go VERY SLOW and be very conscious of abuse (especially emotional abuse as this is how it starts), we have to know what it is and use the thinking parts of our mind to identify the behaviours - obviously without getting all paranoid. If we don't do that it's really creepy how they find us and we find them. One thing I found is that there are very few people in the world that I immediately find attractive, that is because my mind is unconsciously looking for something that compliments the messed up emotional mind and fortunately they are in the minority. It's hell creepy to see the patterns but once you see them you can't not see them. I've attracted and been attracted to some seriously disordered people personally and professionally most of my life - but NO MORE. The real loss for me is that having suffered abuse I now know for a fact that when it comes to choosing people to be with, Abused people CANNOT trust their attraction/love feelings and get all intuitive. We have to think it through rationally but I have found that being more conscious and aware, I'm getting better at it. It's quite a slow part of the healing and it has taken me quite sometime to accept that I really do have an emotional disability. I often feel very angry about it, as it's like being programmed for failure after having survived the ongoing abuse ordeal. Anger can be useful, it makes me more determined to overcome the past.

What I try not to forget, is that there are MANY great people in the world. We may not be attracted to them, but with some patience and time we come to love them in time. It is hard for people that haven't been abused to love us, so we also have to understand and by finding ourselves we make it easier for them to find us.

Thanks for your sharing and MORE POWER TO US

7:52 PM  

I also attract abusers. Somehow they find me and target me. I have been hit, tied up, drugged, held hostage, sexually abused and emotionally abused. They are always nice in the beginning and then after they think they've 'caught' me the abuse starts. I hadn't had a relationship in 12 years and when an old friend came back into my life I decided to give it another try. He gave me flowers, told me how beautiful I was and when he finally won me over that's when the bad treatment started. One night he thought I looked at him funny and he took all the dishes out of the cupboard and threw them on the floor and smashed them. He made a scene in a restaurant, threatening to leave me sitting there by myself because I asked him to have a glass of wine with me. (he said he didn't want to spend the six dollars). I knew he was off mentally but I didn't trust my intuition to leave. My dad had abused me emotionally and physically (but not sexually) so I know that the roots of my problems with men go back to my experience with him. He told me no man would ever want me, that I was ugly and stupid. My mother didn't help because she didn't want to lose the nice lifestyle to which she had become accustomed. Yes I've seen therapists and I understand intellectually what he did to me but the hurt and damage from him and the other abusers remains. Finally I decided to stop dating for good. I devote my energy to helping animals and have placed many in loving homes.

12:59 PM  

I was emotionally abused by two narcissist parents and had a nervous breakdown at the age of 20.

It is not true that predators simply target women who look like pushovers. I have been targeted by both when I was very vulnerable but also later in life when I was pretty strong, successful and dynamic. In fact being this way, seemed to be a great challenge and fun for at least 2 predators.I have often wondered what's wrong with me. I don't think it's in what you seem to radiate, but in not picking up on the early signals, not early enough.

Predators aim to completely fool you pretending to be someone else, and then once they have you, the abuse starts. I thought myself a pretty suspicious person but clearly I wasn't enough.

Here is what i would do differently:
a. don't be too sympathic to guys who seem to want your sympathy for their tough breaks when you are first dating or barely know them-- it's a trick to reel you in

b. Back off completely if something doesn't feel right, sound right or make sense

c. Don't make excuses for them.

d. Three lies (small or large) and they're out

e. Don't trust big, romantic gestures, they're so often a con

If you've been abused in life, you have been trained to make excuses, to forgive and tolerate behaviour that doesn't make sense. And also to trust others, including abusers---rather than your own judgement. YOu keep on hearing people saying that theyc are about you, and then they harm you. So I think people who have been abused don't expect the behaviour of someone who cares, to match the words. They have been trained to think they are too sensitive or wrong to even want this.

5:53 AM  

I disagree with the concept that abused people don't attract abusers and that abusers simply target abused people. This kind of BS psycho babble absolves people (ladies) of any accountability for their choices which led to the circumstances they find themselves in.

I'm certain that abusers are attracted to those who would be abused. But that doesn't mean the abused has to imbibe of the abusers.

It's a symbiotic relationship. Can't have one without the other. To render the abused powerless by not being able to choose good mates, relegates them to a life time of slavery as a victim - always the target, never the captain of her own ship. Her "victimhood" is required to propagate institutions that make a fortune off of victims.

Instead of empowering people by saying, "These events occurred, a dispassionate object review of all the circumstances reveals factors which could have changed the outcome had you been empowered with the following skills..." That says to the mind; "hey, bad things happened, but we can do something about it so we are not only never in this situation again, but so that we thrive and reach the full measure of success our God given talent can achieve."

That message is a damn sight better than, "There are predators out there, and they can take you at will, and do with you as they choose, whenever they choose, because they are evil" Such a message makes the victim little more than a defenseless sheep in a den of wolves, absent any hope of salvation. We have washed our hands of her, and told her that she is bound to a lifetime of abuse unless people smarter than her can make her choices for her. That INFURIATES ME with righteous indignation! SHAME! To hell with these slave traders!

People at their best are powerful souls, not feeble weak slaves. All humanity is disposable otherwise. I am not willing to accept that.

Big G.,
Getting Minds Right
Empowering Humans
Producing National Champions
Getting kids to top colleges
and in general kicking ass since 1969

11:44 AM  

I agree with Big G. Perfect.

5:25 PM  

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